Incite Art, Create Community

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A bumper sticker that says “Incite Art, Create Community” decorates quite a few cars here on Deer Isle (along with “Fish Forever”). Opera House Arts (aka the Opera House) has been selling it for about 20 years, and I experienced its full meaning just the other day.

Incite Art, Create Community

It all started last summer, when my friend Katy Allgeyer decided to incite art, create community by staging an exhibit at her Art By Katy gallery for me and another Leslie married to a Dan, Leslie Anderson. I didn’t know Leslie well, but got to know her during our show, which Katy called Leslie Squared. (You can see my paintings here.)

Then one day in the fall Leslie asked me if I’d like to go painting with her. Of course I did.

So on a gorgeous day in late September we climbed Kezar Mountain in Little Deer Isle and looked down at a smattering of islands. The children’s book author, Robert McCloskey, lived on the island that looked like a pie with a slice cut out – Scott Island.

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That’s Scott Island in the background, Leslie Anderson holding her painting.

I’d actually interviewed McCloskey, sort of, when I was an Associated Press reporter in Boston. Some kid from Boston College had stolen one of the bronze Make Way for Ducklings ducks in the Public Garden. When they found it – in the BC library, I think – I called up McCloskey and asked him what he thought of the theft. “No!” he said. Then he hung up on me. I didn’t blame him one little bit.

Up on Kezar Mountain I painted Scott Island on an Arches watercolor block, which has a flap that protects the paper. Then I took it home, left it on the block and forgot about it.

Scott Island. Watercolor, 10″ by 14.”

Sea Times

Six months later, the Opera House presented Sea Times – local actors portraying Deer Isle old-timers who’d been interviewed by middle school students in the 1980s. They told 20 stories of winter on Deer Isle in the olden days. One reenactor portrayed Robert McCloskey, who talked about the first and only time he spent the winter on Scott Island with his wife and infant daughter.

“Sea Times” intermission at the Opera House. Note that red sweatshirt says, “Incite Art, Create Community” on the back.

The next day I was looking for something in my messy studio and came across the painting of Scott Island. So I posted it on my Facebook page and wrote, “Funny thing…” and told the story.

Then a friend who lives on Deer Isle wanted to know if the painting was for sale. Of course it was. She had gotten to know Robert McCloskey’s daughter Jane and grown fond of her, liked the painting and wanted to buy it.

So hours later Dan and I dropped “Scott Island” off at her home. We had a nice chat about our community and then left with good feeling all round.

By the way, I later painted Leslie painting on top of Kezar Mountain.

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Kezar Mountain, oil on canvas, 8″ by 10.”

That’s how it happens. Incite art, create community.

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Some New Paintings and a New Library Venue

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This summer I ventured beyond Deer Isle — not that far, but still I ventured. And then I finished up the year with a snowscape of Stonington that I’ve been wanting to do since, oh, last winter.

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Stonington Winter, watercolor

The Stonington Library

You can’t quite see the Stonington Public Library in the painting — it’s behind the building to the right. But now about a dozen of my paintings are hanging on the library walls. I’d like to put up a few more, but I’ve got to find frames for them first.

The Stonington Library recently underwent a major renovation, and now it’s even more of a jewel. There’s a new reading nook, a handicapped-accessible public bathroom (a very big deal in an island tourist community) and a new energy efficient furnace. Sadly, the fabulous Vicki Zelnick, who has done wonders with the library, will retire soon. I’ll miss her.

Brooklin

I’ve already posted my first painting of Brooklin here, called Naskeag Point.  And my second, come to think of it — Wooden Boathere.

Recently I finished another one, a watercolor called Wooden Boat School Buoys for fairly obvious reasons.

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Wooden Boat School Buoys, watercolor.

I know the whole buoys-hanging-from-a-tree thing is a cliche, but these had so much energy I had to paint them. Besides, as an art history teacher once said, There’s a good reason cliches become cliches.

Monhegan

Monhegan, watercolor

Here’s a watercolor of Monhegan Island from the stern of the Laura B (or was it the Elizabeth Ann?) Anyhoo, I’d been immersing myself in Andrew Wyeth’s paintings, both at the Farnsworth Museum and at the Wyeth gallery on the second floor of the Port Clyde General Store. One Wyeth painting, an overhead view of a rushing stream called The Carry, really wowed me. Later, as I sat looking out at the wake of the boat I got inspired to paint this.

Then I did a couple of small oils, again inspired by a day trip to Monhegan on a sunny fall day.

Abie Rose, oil on canvas
Monhegan Museum, oil on canvas.

 

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Holiday Pop-Up Market at DIAA

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Some brand-new cards along with old favorites of mine are on sale for a one-day only pop-up market at the  Deer Isle Artists Association from 10 am to 5 pm on Saturday, December 1 at the DIAA Gallery.

I’ve been wanting to paint a snow scene of Stonington for a long time, so this fall I buckled down and painted this watercolor of the town from the harbor.

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Stonington Winter, watercolor

I made cards of the painting, which are on sale at the pop-up market.

Cindy Bourque-Simonds, DIAA’s most tireless board member, runs the pop-up market by herself. “This is a different kind of a show for us, because many of our artists are trying something new and pricing them as affordable gifts,” she said for the official press release.

New Oil Paintings

For me, something new is an oil painting of the kayak launch at the Wooden Boat School in Brooklin, Maine.

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Wooden Boat, oil on canvas

That, too, is on sale at the pop-up market, along with a small oil painting of my friend Leslie Anderson. We painted together last fall on the top of Kezar Mountain in Little Deer Isle.  As you can see I painted it loosely, which was quite fun.

Next on my agenda: I have some big — for me at least — wooden panels. They’re two feet by three feet, and I plan to finish them over the winter.

 

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Essence of Island Life, the Last DIAA Show for 2018

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Part of the essence of island life, at least in Maine, is that summer comes to a screeching halt. All of a sudden the take-out shacks close, the summer homes close up and lobster gear (including fishing boats) start to fill the yards.

On Sept. 25, the Deer Isle Artists Association opened the final show of the season, “Essence of Island Life.” I don’t always pay as much attention as I should to the  DIAA exhibit themes, but this time I did.

Essence of Island Life

I submitted three oil paintings and three watercolors, and all arguably depict the essence of island life. Two small oils feature Eggemoggin Reach, which separates Deer Isle from what William Butler Yeats once called ‘the old bitter continent.’

And then the biggest oil painting I’ve ever done: Naskeag Point. OK, Naskeag Point is a peninsula in Brooklin, Maine, which isn’t exactly an island. But I think the trees, the islands, the water and the clouds do give a fair representation of the essence of island life.

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Naskeag Point, oil on canvas

My watercolor Powder Island shows a familiar scene in Stonington Harbor. Fishing boats and dories pass it all day long on the way to and from Fish Pier.  The quarries on Crotch Island used to store powder on that middle island for blasting rock. The island quarries are a whole ‘nother story that can wait.

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Powder Island, watercolor

The vantage point for Powder Island is from Inn on the Harbor. Dan and I stayed there while deciding exactly which coastal town in Maine we should move to. The inn helped us make up our mind.

One of the inn’s new owners, Dana Durst, was walking on a sandbar in Smalls Cove late one afternoon in July. Smalls Cove faces west and gets tremendous sunsets, but I almost prefer the quality of the pre-sunset light. I really like this painting, and I kind of hope no one buys it. Which usually means someone will.

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Smalls Cove, watercolor

So if you’re in Deer Isle, stop by and see The Essence of Island Life: An exhibit of baskets, painting, photography, pottery and weaving.The reception with artists (which, sadly, I will miss) is on Sunday, Sept. 30, from 3-5 pm at the DIAA gallery in Deer Isle.

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Small Works Show at DIAA

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The popular Small Works exhibit begins at the Deer Isle Artist Association on August 28 at 10 am and runs for two weeks.

I have seven small paintings in the show, including four oil paintings of Ames Pond, two watercolors of Brooksville, Maine, and one watercolor of Ossipee Mountain in New Hampshire.

Ames Pond, much loved in Stonington, proves you don’t need to go to Giverny to paint water lilies. Ames Pond used to be a meadow until it was dammed to make ice. For many years, people on Deer Isle cut ice from Ames Pond for their own use, and to ship to the West Indies for trade.

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Ames Pond I. Oil on canvas.

Around 1932, a Deer Islander planted pink waterlilies in the pond, and they proliferated. The beavers love to eat their roots.

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Ames Pond II. Oil on canvas.

Between 9 am and 2 pm in summer, the pink waterliles, as well as the wild white and yellow ones, open to the sun.

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Ames Pond III. Oil on canvas.

I spent many hours as a young adult in front of Monet’s water lilies. I just loved them. Then after a while I got sick of them.  Perhaps I saw them on too many NPR tote bags, or at least thought I did.

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Ames Pond IV. Oil on canvas.

But then, as a painter living in Maine, I found it  difficult NOT to paint Ames Pond. And I also found it nearly impossible NOT to take a page from Old Claude.

Other Small Works Paintings

Every Tuesday morning this summer you’ll find me selling prints, cards and paintings at the Brooksville Farmers Market.

I’ve wanted to paint Buck’s Market, a wonderful old general store near the market, since I first laid eyes on it. Many, many photographs later, I finally came up with images I could use for a watercolor:

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Buck’s Market. Watercolor.

Brooksville people ask me if I have any paintings of Cape Rosier, a lovely wild peninsula in Brooksville. As a result, I do– at the Small Works show.

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Cape Rosier. Watercolor.

Finally, just to mix things up, I finished a long-unfinished watercolor of Ossipee Mountain for the Small Works show.  It was certainly a relief to paint snow after all that sunlight and greenery!

Ossipee Mountain. Watercolor.

 

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