Essence of Island Life, the Last DIAA Show for 2018

essence-of-island-life-smalls-cove
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Part of the essence of island life, at least in Maine, is that summer comes to a screeching halt. All of a sudden the take-out shacks close, the summer homes close up and lobster gear (including fishing boats) start to fill the yards.

On Sept. 25, the Deer Isle Artists Association opened the final show of the season, “Essence of Island Life.” I don’t always pay as much attention as I should to the  DIAA exhibit themes, but this time I did.

Essence of Island Life

I submitted three oil paintings and three watercolors, and all arguably depict the essence of island life. Two small oils feature Eggemoggin Reach, which separates Deer Isle from what William Butler Yeats once called ‘the old bitter continent.’

And then the biggest oil painting I’ve ever done: Naskeag Point. OK, Naskeag Point is a peninsula in Brooklin, Maine, which isn’t exactly an island. But I think the trees, the islands, the water and the clouds do give a fair representation of the essence of island life.

essence-of-island-life-naskeag-point
Naskeag Point, oil on canvas

My watercolor Powder Island shows a familiar scene in Stonington Harbor. Fishing boats and dories pass it all day long on the way to and from Fish Pier.  The quarries on Crotch Island used to store powder on that middle island for blasting rock. The island quarries are a whole ‘nother story that can wait.

essence-of-island-life-powder-island
Powder Island, watercolor

The vantage point for Powder Island is from Inn on the Harbor. Dan and I stayed there while deciding exactly which coastal town in Maine we should move to. The inn helped us make up our mind.

One of the inn’s new owners, Dana Durst, was walking on a sandbar in Smalls Cove late one afternoon in July. Smalls Cove faces west and gets tremendous sunsets, but I almost prefer the quality of the pre-sunset light. I really like this painting, and I kind of hope no one buys it. Which usually means someone will.

essence-of-island-life-smalls-cove
Smalls Cove, watercolor

So if you’re in Deer Isle, stop by and see The Essence of Island Life: An exhibit of baskets, painting, photography, pottery and weaving.The reception with artists (which, sadly, I will miss) is on Sunday, Sept. 30, from 3-5 pm at the DIAA gallery in Deer Isle.

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Small Works Show at DIAA

small-works-ames-pond-4
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The popular Small Works exhibit begins at the Deer Isle Artist Association on August 28 at 10 am and runs for two weeks.

I have seven small paintings in the show, including four oil paintings of Ames Pond, two watercolors of Brooksville, Maine, and one watercolor of Ossipee Mountain in New Hampshire.

Ames Pond, much loved in Stonington, proves you don’t need to go to Giverny to paint water lilies. Ames Pond used to be a meadow until it was dammed to make ice. For many years, people on Deer Isle cut ice from Ames Pond for their own use, and to ship to the West Indies for trade.

small-works-ames-pond
Ames Pond I. Oil on canvas.

Around 1932, a Deer Islander planted pink waterlilies in the pond, and they proliferated. The beavers love to eat their roots.

small-works-ames-pond-2
Ames Pond II. Oil on canvas.

Between 9 am and 2 pm in summer, the pink waterliles, as well as the wild white and yellow ones, open to the sun.

small-works-ames-pond-3
Ames Pond III. Oil on canvas.

I spent many hours as a young adult in front of Monet’s water lilies. I just loved them. Then after a while I got sick of them.  Perhaps I saw them on too many NPR tote bags, or at least thought I did.

small-works-ames-pond-4
Ames Pond IV. Oil on canvas.

But then, as a painter living in Maine, I found it  difficult NOT to paint Ames Pond. And I also found it nearly impossible NOT to take a page from Old Claude.

Other Small Works Paintings

Every Tuesday morning this summer you’ll find me selling prints, cards and paintings at the Brooksville Farmers Market.

I’ve wanted to paint Buck’s Market, a wonderful old general store near the market, since I first laid eyes on it. Many, many photographs later, I finally came up with images I could use for a watercolor:

small-works-bucks-market
Buck’s Market. Watercolor.

Brooksville people ask me if I have any paintings of Cape Rosier, a lovely wild peninsula in Brooksville. As a result, I do– at the Small Works show.

small-works-cape-rosier
Cape Rosier. Watercolor.

Finally, just to mix things up, I finished a long-unfinished watercolor of Ossipee Mountain for the Small Works show.  It was certainly a relief to paint snow after all that sunlight and greenery!

Ossipee Mountain. Watercolor.

 

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Small Works Show at the Deer Isle Artists Association

small-works-bucks-market

The popular Small Works exhibit begins at the Deer Isle Artist Association on August 28 at 10 am and runs for two weeks.

I have seven small paintings in the show, including four oil paintings of Ames Pond, two watercolors of Brooksville, Maine, and one watercolor of Ossipee Mountain in New Hampshire.

Ames Pond, much loved in Stonington, proves you don’t need to go to Giverny to paint water lilies. Ames Pond used to be a meadow until it was dammed to make ice. For many years, people on Deer Isle cut ice from Ames Pond for their own use, and to ship to the West Indies for trade.

small-works-ames-pond
Ames Pond I. Oil on canvas.

Around 1932, a Deer Islander planted pink waterlilies in the pond, and they proliferated. The beavers love to eat their roots.

small-works-ames-pond-2
Ames Pond II. Oil on canvas.

Between 9 am and 2 pm in summer, the pink waterliles, as well as the wild white and yellow ones, open to the sun.

small-works-ames-pond-3
Ames Pond III. Oil on canvas.

I spent many hours as a young adult in front of Monet’s water lilies. I just loved them. Then after a while I got sick of them.  Perhaps I saw them on too many NPR tote bags, or at least thought I did.

small-works-ames-pond-4
Ames Pond IV. Oil on canvas.

But then, as a painter living in Maine, I found it  difficult NOT to paint Ames Pond. And I also found it nearly impossible NOT to take a page from Old Claude.

Other Small Works Paintings

Every Tuesday morning this summer you’ll find me selling prints, cards and paintings at the Brooksville Farmers Market.

I’ve wanted to paint Buck’s Market, a wonderful old general store near the market, since I first laid eyes on it. Many, many photographs later, I finally came up with images I could use for a watercolor:

small-works-bucks-market
Buck’s Market. Watercolor.

Brooksville people ask me if I have any paintings of Cape Rosier, a lovely wild peninsula in Brooksville. As a result, I do– at the Small Works show.

small-works-cape-rosier
Cape Rosier. Watercolor.

Finally, just to mix things up, I finished a long-unfinished watercolor of Ossipee Mountain for the Small Works show.  It was certainly a relief to paint snow after all that sunlight and greenery!

Ossipee Mountain. Watercolor.

 

Engagement of Poetry at DIAA

engagement-of-poetry-dories
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I didn’t expect to be in the Deer Isle Artists Association  latest exhibit, Engagement of Poetry, but someone dropped out. So when asked if I’d participate, of course I said yes.

Since I’ve had such a busy summer, I only had time to submit three watercolors. I ended up with three very different ones.

Engagement of Poetry

The first, Brooksville Morning, came about because I go to the Brooksville Farmers Market every Tuesday to sell prints, cards and original artwork. I drive past this farm to get there, and I love how it looks in the fog. (There’s been a lot of fog this summer.)

We had to come up with statements about what inspired our work for the Exhibit of Poetry show. Here’s what I wrote for Brooksville Morning:

Fog reveals the loveliness of the earth on a summer morning.

engagement-of-poetry-brooksville-morning
Brooksville Morning, watercolor. Shown at ‘Engagement of Poetry’ exhibit.

The second painting, Dories, came about because I love these old boats. They’re tied up on a rocky little beach in Stonington.

Back in the day, farmers built dories like this in summer and used them to fish for lobster in the summer. Today, their owner uses them to seine for bait.

engagement-of-poetry-dories
Dories, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry at DIAA.

Here’s what I wrote for Engagement of Poetry:

The wisdom of old boats, the enchantment of the sea.

That ‘enchantment’ business may sound sappy, but it’s true. Stonington has for a long time had some of the best sailors and fishermen in the world, and it isn’t because they hate the sea.

Finally, here’s an image that started out as a sketch for another painting.  I made it up; it has part Stonington, part Cape Rosier in Brooksville and part Eggemoggin Reach in Deer Isle.

engagement-of-poetry-clouds
Clouds, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry.

Above the limpid sea, clouds are never still.

So come on down to the DIAA at 15 Main St. in Deer Isle. The artists’ reception is Sunday, Aug. 19, from 3-5 pm. We’ll also be at DIS Friday on Friday, Aug. 17, with cookies, lemonade and used art books for sale (in addition to the art).

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Engagement of Poetry at DIAA

engagement-of-poetry-dories

I didn’t expect to be in the Deer Isle Artists Association  latest exhibit, Engagement of Poetry, but someone dropped out. So when asked if I’d participate, of course I said yes.

Since I’ve had such a busy summer, I only had time to submit three watercolors. I ended up with three very different ones.

Engagement of Poetry

The first, Brooksville Morning, came about because I go to the Brooksville Farmers Market every Tuesday to sell prints, cards and original artwork. I drive past this farm to get there, and I love how it looks in the fog. (There’s been a lot of fog this summer.)

We had to come up with statements about what inspired our work for the Exhibit of Poetry show. Here’s what I wrote for Brooksville Morning:

Fog reveals the loveliness of the earth on a summer morning.

engagement-of-poetry-brooksville-morning
Brooksville Morning, watercolor. Shown at ‘Engagement of Poetry’ exhibit. 

The second painting, Dories, came about because I love these old boats. They’re tied up on a rocky little beach in Stonington.

Back in the day, farmers built dories like this in summer and used them to fish for lobster in the summer. Today, their owner uses them to seine for bait.

engagement-of-poetry-dories
Dories, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry at DIAA.

Here’s what I wrote for Engagement of Poetry:

The wisdom of old boats, the enchantment of the sea.

That ‘enchantment’ business may sound sappy, but it’s true. Stonington has for a long time had some of the best sailors and fishermen in the world, and it isn’t because they hate the sea.

Finally, here’s an image that started out as a sketch for another painting.  I made it up; it has part Stonington, part Cape Rosier in Brooksville and part Eggemoggin Reach in Deer Isle.

engagement-of-poetry-clouds
Clouds, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry.

Above the limpid sea, clouds are never still.

 

 

 

The 12 by 12 (By 12) Is Here!

12-by-12-Farmers-Market
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The Deer Isle Artists Association’s popular 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibit is scheduled to start Tuesday, July 31, at 10 am sharp.

Be there at the starting gate if you have your eye on a particular work of art.

The 12 by 12 (By 12) features paintings, prints and collages (also known as wall art) no bigger than 12″ by 12.” It also includes 3-dimensional art, such as ceramics, baskets, fiber art and sculpture, also no bigger than — you guessed it — 12″ by 12″ by 12″.

Every work of art sells at an extremely reasonable price of $144 ($12 X $12). The gallery hangs new work as pieces sell. The show lasts two weeks, as all DIAA summer exhibits do, until August 12.

The exhibit is important to the DIAA because it raises money for operating costs.

If you’d like to meet the artists, the reception will be held on Sunday, Aug. 5, from 3 pm to 5 pm. Wine and lemonade will be served, and there will be plenty of food as well.

I’ve shown my work in the past two 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibits. This year I’m donating three watercolors to the show.

They are: Farmers Market,12-by-12-Farmers-Market

Farmers Market, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″Caterpillar Hill and

12-by-12-Caterpillar-Hill
Caterpillar Hill, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

and, finally, Cape Rosier.

12-by-12-Cape-Rosier
Cape Rosier, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

These are all Maine scenes. Farmers Market, as its name implies, pictures a scene from the Stonington Farmers Market,

Caterpillar Hill is the view from a stunning lookout on Route 15 on the way to Deer Isle (or the way back). It overlooks Penobscot Bay, the island and the Penobscot River. If you happen to drive by, check out the informational markers. I believe they explain the disastrous Penobscot Expedition during the American Revolution. It didn’t go well for Paul Revere.

Cape Rosier is a part of Brooksville, also part of the Blue Hill peninsula. I’ve just recently discovered this beautiful part of the world and plan to paint much more of it!

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DIAA’s 12 by 12 (By 12) Show Starts

12-by-12-Farmers-Market

The Deer Isle Artists Association’s popular 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibit is scheduled to start Tuesday, July 31, at 10 am sharp.

Be there at the starting gate if you have your eye on a particular work of art.

The 12 by 12 (By 12) features paintings, prints and collages (also known as wall art) no bigger than 12″ by 12.” It also includes 3-dimensional art, such as ceramics, baskets, fiber art and sculpture, also no bigger than — you guessed it — 12″ by 12″ by 12″.

Every work of art sells at an extremely reasonable price of $144 ($12 X $12). The gallery hangs new work as pieces sell. The show lasts two weeks, as all DIAA summer exhibits do, until August 12.

The exhibit is important to the DIAA because it raises money for operating costs.

If you’d like to meet the artists, the reception will be held on Sunday, Aug. 5, from 3 pm to 5 pm. Wine and lemonade will be served, and there will be plenty of food as well.

I’ve shown my work in the past two 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibits. This year I’m donating three watercolors to the show.

They are: Farmers Market,12-by-12-Farmers-Market

Farmers Market, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

Caterpillar Hill and

12-by-12-Caterpillar-Hill
Caterpillar Hill, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

and, finally, Cape Rosier.

12-by-12-Cape-Rosier
Cape Rosier, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

These are all Maine scenes. Farmers Market, as its name implies, pictures a scene from the Stonington Farmers Market,

Caterpillar Hill is the view from a stunning lookout on Route 15 on the way to Deer Isle (or the way back). It overlooks Penobscot Bay, the island and the Penobscot River. If you happen to drive by, check out the informational markers. I believe they explain the disastrous Penobscot Expedition during the American Revolution. It didn’t go well for Paul Revere.

Cape Rosier is a part of Brooksville, also part of the Blue Hill peninsula. I’ve just recently discovered this beautiful part of the world and plan to paint much more of it!

Shape of Waters at the Deer Isle Artists Association

shape-of-waters-44-north
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The Shape of Waters exhibit has already started at the Deer Isle Artists Association  in Deer Isle Village. I have five paintings in the show, all of which depict some kind of work.

Why Work?

When I left journalism to work for a labor union, I thought I should decorate my office with an image of an American worker. So I went to the National Gallery of Art, thinking the gift shop would have a poster, print or even a notecard  depicting someone at work.

I was hoping for a nice big WPA poster,

shape-of-waters-forging

but I would have settled for a print of an Ashcan School painting — McSorley’s Bar, for example.

shape-of-waters-mcsorleys-bar
McSorley’s Bar by John Sloan.

By the time I’d spent an hour looking through the merchandise, I would have been happy to find a notecard with Millet’s The Gleaners on it.

shape-of-waters-gleaner
Jean-Francois Millet, The Gleaners

I couldn’t find one single reproduction of a painting, print or sculpture that showed an American working. I’d soon learn how invisible the working class is in the United States, but that’s a whole other story.

Since moving to Deer Isle I’ve started to paint people at work. Usually I’ll spot them in a certain light or against a certain backdrop and I’ll ask them if I can take their picture. I take a bunch, then sometimes I go back and study the setting a little more. That’s what I did when I spotted Danielle washing windows at Inn on the Harbor.

shape-of-waters-danielle
Danielle

The painting now hangs against the yellow wall in the Inn on the Harbor lobby.

Since then I’ve done more, including Kim at 44 North. That painting — 44 North — is now in the Shape of Waters show.

shape-of-waters-44-north
44 North

I also have a painting of Dan collecting beach glass at Scott’s Landing, which is work to him, in the Shape of Waters show. Others show a painter caulking a windowsill, a shipyard worker scraping a boat, and the Stonington town cat — yes, that would be Dundee) supervising the town.

So come by and see the Shape of Waters show. There’s a reception from 3-5 pm on Sunday, July 8, at the gallery, where you can meet all the artists.

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Shape of Waters at the Deer Isle Artists Association

shape-of-waters-44-north

The Shape of Waters exhibit has already started at the Deer Isle Artists Association  in Deer Isle Village. I have five paintings in the show, all of which depict some kind of work.

Why Work?

When I left journalism to work for a labor union, I thought I should decorate my office with an image of an American worker. So I went to the National Gallery of Art, thinking the gift shop would have a poster, print or even a notecard  depicting someone at work.

I was hoping for a nice big WPA poster,

shape-of-waters-forging

but I would have settled for a print of an Ashcan School painting — McSorley’s Bar, for example.

shape-of-waters-mcsorleys-bar
McSorley’s Bar by John Sloan.

By the time I’d spent an hour looking through the merchandise, I would have been happy to find a notecard with Millet’s The Gleaners on it.

shape-of-waters-gleaner
Jean-Francois Millet, The Gleaners

I couldn’t find one single reproduction of a painting, print or sculpture that showed an American working. I’d soon learn how invisible the working class is in the United States, but that’s a whole other story.

Since moving to Deer Isle I’ve started to paint people at work. Usually I’ll spot them in a certain light or against a certain backdrop and I’ll ask them if I can take their picture. I take a bunch, then sometimes I go back and study the setting a little more. That’s what I did when I spotted Danielle washing windows at Inn on the Harbor.

shape-of-waters-danielle
Danielle

The painting now hangs against the yellow wall in the Inn on the Harbor lobby.

Since then I’ve done more, including Kim at 44 North. That painting — 44 North — is now in the Shape of Waters show.

shape-of-waters-44-north
44 North

I also have a painting of Dan collecting beach glass at Scott’s Landing, which is work to him, in the Shape of Waters show. Others show a painter caulking a windowsill, a shipyard worker scraping a boat, and the Stonington town cat — yes, that would be Dundee) supervising the town.

So come by and see the Shape of Waters show. There’s a reception from 3-5 pm on Sunday, July 8, at the gallery, where you can meet all the artists.

 

Paintings and Prints at DIAA “Distinctive Marks” Show

lupine-madness-smaller
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I’ll have both paintings and prints in the Deer Isle Artists Association show, Distinctive Marks, starting Tuesday, June 19.  My paintings will all be watercolor (though I am doing oils these days too), and they’re all new.

Like this one:

distinctinve-marks-barred-island
Barred Island

All my work for this show will be landscapes. Because they were painted between November and June, the palette ranges from somber to bright.

November Sunset, for example, shows Causeway Beach in (you guessed it) November.  As I recall I painted it just after the furnace went out on a very cold day.

November Sunset, watercolor, 12″ by 16″.

A very long, wet, dreary spring followed our very long winter here in Maine. Only recently did the temperature exceed 70 — and that was in June, for godsake. But suddenly the sky cleared, the sun came out and  the flowers bloomed. Many, many flowers bloomed, and they did it all at once.

So after toiling over a muted palette I wanted to paint something bright and exuberant. I had plenty of scenes to choose from, but I picked one of my favorite views: from Highland Avenue in Stonington, looking down at the harbor.

lupine-madness-smaller
Lupine Madness, watercolor, 11.5 by 11.5.

Distinctive Marks is an exhibit of 3-D works, painting, photographs, pottery and sculpture . Also showing work in the Distinctive Marks show will be Emily Brett Lukens. Ron Deprez, Mary Eaton, Steve Ettlinger, Alan Flowers, Stephan Haley, Jill Kofton, Jerry Levitt, Luna Lyman, Julie Meranze-Levitt, Woodley Osborne, Cynthia Stroud-Watson, Maura Tillotson and Alice Wilkinson.

A reception for the artists will be held Sunday, June 24, from 3-5 pm at the DIAA gallery.

The Deer Isle Artists Association, founded in 1972,

Founded in 1972, the Deer Isle Artists Association is a member-run nonprofit organization committed to creating and exhibiting art. Our more than 100 members include painters, sculptors, printmakers, jewelers, fiber artists, photographers, ceramicists and other artists.

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