Engagement of Poetry at DIAA

engagement-of-poetry-dories

I didn’t expect to be in the Deer Isle Artists Association  latest exhibit, Engagement of Poetry, but someone dropped out. So when asked if I’d participate, of course I said yes.

Since I’ve had such a busy summer, I only had time to submit three watercolors. I ended up with three very different ones.

Engagement of Poetry

The first, Brooksville Morning, came about because I go to the Brooksville Farmers Market every Tuesday to sell prints, cards and original artwork. I drive past this farm to get there, and I love how it looks in the fog. (There’s been a lot of fog this summer.)

We had to come up with statements about what inspired our work for the Exhibit of Poetry show. Here’s what I wrote for Brooksville Morning:

Fog reveals the loveliness of the earth on a summer morning.

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Brooksville Morning, watercolor. Shown at ‘Engagement of Poetry’ exhibit. 

The second painting, Dories, came about because I love these old boats. They’re tied up on a rocky little beach in Stonington.

Back in the day, farmers built dories like this in summer and used them to fish for lobster in the summer. Today, their owner uses them to seine for bait.

engagement-of-poetry-dories
Dories, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry at DIAA.

Here’s what I wrote for Engagement of Poetry:

The wisdom of old boats, the enchantment of the sea.

That ‘enchantment’ business may sound sappy, but it’s true. Stonington has for a long time had some of the best sailors and fishermen in the world, and it isn’t because they hate the sea.

Finally, here’s an image that started out as a sketch for another painting.  I made it up; it has part Stonington, part Cape Rosier in Brooksville and part Eggemoggin Reach in Deer Isle.

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Clouds, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry.

Above the limpid sea, clouds are never still.

 

 

 

On Day Three, Two Deer Isle Artists in Residence

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Oscar lays out his things and starts work on a sketch of the guys jamming at the Church of the Morning After.  It’s not much more than a fish shack. Everyone is welcome to listen or play there on Sunday mornings at 7.

I show Oscar the pastel I’ve done of the outside of Church. He shows me a watercolor sketch he did.

“It’s the best thing on the island,” he says, meaning the Church. He tells me he wants to do a new painting in color. It’s the most ambitious thing he’s done so far, I think. I work on a new painting of Cadillac Mountain.

We take a break at lunch and walk to 44 North for coffee. Rufus recognizes me. “I met you before,” he says. “Last summer. You do the web work for the Farmer’s Market.” We chat. Oscar orders some Sumatra coffee and explains he wants it ground fine, not too fine. Rufus says he wants to have sketching sessions in the summer at the 44 North shop in Stonington. Maybe Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings. “Oscar would love that,” I said. “He can walk to it.”

As we come back from 44 North, Oscar points to a house. He’s trying to tell me something but I don’t understand. Later I do. He was pointing to the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts building on Rte. 15. “That’s where Stu Kestenbaum works,” he says.

“He’s a nice guy,” I say. “I play pickleball with him.”

Oscar tells me he went to one of Stu’s poetry readings. Stu is the poet laureate of Maine. Oscar sat up front, loved Stu’s poetry. Afterward he talked to Stu. “I can’t talk. I get frustrated,” he says.

Oscar can’t always say what we wants to say since he had a stroke. But he usually gets across his meaning. Besides, a lot of idle chit chat is overrated.

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