DIAA’s 12 by 12 (By 12) Show Starts

12-by-12-Farmers-Market

The Deer Isle Artists Association’s popular 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibit is scheduled to start Tuesday, July 31, at 10 am sharp.

Be there at the starting gate if you have your eye on a particular work of art.

The 12 by 12 (By 12) features paintings, prints and collages (also known as wall art) no bigger than 12″ by 12.” It also includes 3-dimensional art, such as ceramics, baskets, fiber art and sculpture, also no bigger than — you guessed it — 12″ by 12″ by 12″.

Every work of art sells at an extremely reasonable price of $144 ($12 X $12). The gallery hangs new work as pieces sell. The show lasts two weeks, as all DIAA summer exhibits do, until August 12.

The exhibit is important to the DIAA because it raises money for operating costs.

If you’d like to meet the artists, the reception will be held on Sunday, Aug. 5, from 3 pm to 5 pm. Wine and lemonade will be served, and there will be plenty of food as well.

I’ve shown my work in the past two 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibits. This year I’m donating three watercolors to the show.

They are: Farmers Market,12-by-12-Farmers-Market

Farmers Market, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

Caterpillar Hill and

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Caterpillar Hill, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

and, finally, Cape Rosier.

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Cape Rosier, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

These are all Maine scenes. Farmers Market, as its name implies, pictures a scene from the Stonington Farmers Market,

Caterpillar Hill is the view from a stunning lookout on Route 15 on the way to Deer Isle (or the way back). It overlooks Penobscot Bay, the island and the Penobscot River. If you happen to drive by, check out the informational markers. I believe they explain the disastrous Penobscot Expedition during the American Revolution. It didn’t go well for Paul Revere.

Cape Rosier is a part of Brooksville, also part of the Blue Hill peninsula. I’ve just recently discovered this beautiful part of the world and plan to paint much more of it!

DIS Friday in Stonington at the Island Agency

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I’ll be selling new watercolor paintings, some oldies but goodies, prints, notecards and postcards at the Island Agency in Stonington on Friday, July 6. It’s DIS Friday (Deer Isle-Stonington for the uninitiated), which goes from 5-7 pm in downtown Stonington.

Wine and hors d’oeuvres are inseparable from art, so I’ll have those on hand, too!

Here’s one of my favorite new paintings I’ll bring along:

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Deer Isle Morning

It’s a scene from just past the causeway across from Scott’s Landing.

I’ll also bring along a couple of watercolors with more somber palettes. This one, for example, also shows a scene from the causeway, but in November.

november-sunset
November Sunset, watercolor, 12″ by 16″.

It reflected my mood at the time. I believe our furnace had just gone on the fritz.

Changing Seasons, Changing Palette

I’ve noticed, though, that my paintings get darker and more muted in the winter, and brighter and sunnier in the summer.

For example, here’s a watercolor I did of the forest floor at the Island Heritage Trust’s Tennis Reservation.

tennis-reservation
Tennis, watercolor 12″ by 16″

I painted Tennis in April, when it’s cold and raw and overcast every single day. Or at least it seems like that.

But then comes summer and my palette gets a lot brighter — especially when the lupines come out.

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Lupine Madness, watercolor, 11.5″ by 11.5″

Tomorrow at the Island Agency I’ll be selling matted prints of Lupine Madness, Deer Isle Morningand other paintings of Deer Isle for $20. I’ll also have prints of some paintings of interiors — which usually means cats.

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Window Kitty

Inventory isn’t my strong suit (I’m an artist, after all), but I will have some notecards and postcards for sale as well. And all the paintings shown here are available as small (4.5″ by 6.5″ in 8″ by 10″ mats) for $20.

So please stop by the Island Agency tomorrow and check out my artwork.

Leslie Squared at ART by KATY

artbykaty
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Tonight at 4 pm starts the soft launch of the Leslie Squared show (OK, I admit, I haven’t figured out how to make the squared symbol on my laptop yet) at ART by KATY. The show features oil paintings by Leslie Anderson and me, Leslie Landrigan. Both of us are married to Dans and both of us paint landscapes, so voila!

Tonight (July 6) is DIS Friday in Stonington, and Katy Allgeyer is holding a reception for Leslie Squared at her ART by KATY gallery at 22 Weed Field Rd.

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The Art By Katy gallery at 22 Weed Field Rd.

Here’s Katy two days before the Friday party:

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Katy Allgeyer in celebratory Fourth of July fashion.

Katy has done a great job promoting the Leslie Squared Show at ART by KATY. We’re in the Bangor Daily News, the Ellsworth American and the Island Advantages.

My Dan and his family, visiting Deer Isle at the time, dropped by the Art By Katy gallery on Wednesday for a peek at the paintings, a glass of wine and some very smart edibles. I believe they were duly impressed by the rustic charm of the gallery.

Katy is relaunching the gallery after a hiatus of several years. She’s worked really hard to make it a very appealing space, and I’m excited to be part of her  reopening!

At the Gallery

Here’s a peek at one of my paintings in the show:

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Acadian Horseback, oil on canvas, 16″ by 20″

And here’s a peek at one of Leslie Anderson’s paintings:

art-by-katy-leslie-anderson

The big ART by KATY opening pARTy will start the next night, Saturday, July 7, from 4-7 pm. There’ll be more wine, more smart edibles, fun and interesting people as well as oil paintings by someone named Leslie.

Leslie and I, by the way, both started out doing watercolors, and we’ve both branched out into oils. Which is what you’ll see at the show, which runs until July 26.

So be there or be squared!

 

 

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Leslie Squared at ART by KATY

artbykaty

Tonight at 4 pm starts the soft launch of the Leslie Squared show (OK, I admit, I haven’t figured out how to make the squared symbol on my laptop yet) at ART by KATY. The show features oil paintings by Leslie Anderson and me, Leslie Landrigan. Both of us are married to Dans and both of us paint landscapes, so voila!

Tonight (July 6) is DIS Friday in Stonington, and Katy Allgeyer is holding a reception for Leslie Squared at her ART by KATY gallery at 22 Weed Field Rd.

artbykaty
The Art By Katy gallery at 22 Weed Field Rd.

Here’s Katy two days before the Friday party:

art-by-katy-allgeyer
Katy Allgeyer in celebratory Fourth of July fashion.

Katy has done a great job promoting the Leslie Squared Show at ART by KATY. We’re in the Bangor Daily News, the Ellsworth American and the Island Advantages.

My Dan and his family, visiting Deer Isle at the time, dropped by the Art By Katy gallery on Wednesday for a peek at the paintings, a glass of wine and some very smart edibles. I believe they were duly impressed by the rustic charm of the gallery.

Katy is relaunching the gallery after a hiatus of several years. She’s worked really hard to make it a very appealing space, and I’m excited to be part of her  reopening!

At the Gallery

Here’s a peek at one of my paintings in the show:

art-by-katy-landrigan-acadian-horseback
Acadian Horseback, oil on canvas, 16″ by 20″

And here’s a peek at one of Leslie Anderson’s paintings:

The big ART by KATY opening pARTy will start the next night, Saturday, July 7, from 4-7 pm. There’ll be more wine, more smart edibles, fun and interesting people as well as oil paintings by someone named Leslie.

Leslie and I, by the way, both started out doing watercolors, and we’ve both branched out into oils. Which is what you’ll see at the show, which runs until July 26.

So be there or be squared!

Shape of Waters at the Deer Isle Artists Association

shape-of-waters-44-north

The Shape of Waters exhibit has already started at the Deer Isle Artists Association  in Deer Isle Village. I have five paintings in the show, all of which depict some kind of work.

Why Work?

When I left journalism to work for a labor union, I thought I should decorate my office with an image of an American worker. So I went to the National Gallery of Art, thinking the gift shop would have a poster, print or even a notecard  depicting someone at work.

I was hoping for a nice big WPA poster,

shape-of-waters-forging

but I would have settled for a print of an Ashcan School painting — McSorley’s Bar, for example.

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McSorley’s Bar by John Sloan.

By the time I’d spent an hour looking through the merchandise, I would have been happy to find a notecard with Millet’s The Gleaners on it.

shape-of-waters-gleaner
Jean-Francois Millet, The Gleaners

I couldn’t find one single reproduction of a painting, print or sculpture that showed an American working. I’d soon learn how invisible the working class is in the United States, but that’s a whole other story.

Since moving to Deer Isle I’ve started to paint people at work. Usually I’ll spot them in a certain light or against a certain backdrop and I’ll ask them if I can take their picture. I take a bunch, then sometimes I go back and study the setting a little more. That’s what I did when I spotted Danielle washing windows at Inn on the Harbor.

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Danielle

The painting now hangs against the yellow wall in the Inn on the Harbor lobby.

Since then I’ve done more, including Kim at 44 North. That painting — 44 North — is now in the Shape of Waters show.

shape-of-waters-44-north
44 North

I also have a painting of Dan collecting beach glass at Scott’s Landing, which is work to him, in the Shape of Waters show. Others show a painter caulking a windowsill, a shipyard worker scraping a boat, and the Stonington town cat — yes, that would be Dundee) supervising the town.

So come by and see the Shape of Waters show. There’s a reception from 3-5 pm on Sunday, July 8, at the gallery, where you can meet all the artists.

 

Industrial Maine: Our Other Landscape

landrigan-exhibits-bucksport-paper-mill

The Industrial Maine exhibit at the Atrium Gallery in Lewiston motivated me to paint something that makes me angry.

Usually I paint scenes that delight or surprise me. But for a long time I’ve had the urge to paint something that infuriates me — like the dismantling of  U.S. manufacturing.

And if that sounds abstract to you, just ask yourself how Donald Trump got elected.

So when I saw the call for artists for the exhibit, “Industrial Maine: Our Other Landscape,” I already knew what I wanted to paint.

landrigan-exhibits-bucksport-paper-mill
Bucksport Paper Mill, watercolor, 16″ by 20″

Industrial Maine

Industrial Maine belongs to the past, really. Mills and factories used to support tens of thousands of families in Maine. Now, however, tourism ranks as the state’s No. 1 industry.  And the tourist dollar can be a hard one to earn.

Maine suffers deeply from the flight of manufacturing. You can see the evidence everywhere if  you look beyond Portland or Camden or Castine.  Food pantries in every town. Suicides reported in the newspapers. Syringes lying along the roadsides. Smoke pouring from the chimneys of ramshackle campers in the dead of winter.

The picturesque fishing village I live in, Stonington, used to have a sardine factory. It’s gone, like every other seafood canning business in North America. And a lot of jobs disappeared with it.

industrial-maine-exhibits-landrigan
Though Stonington lost its sardine factory, we still have lots of fishing.

We’re lucky in Stonington. We still have a shipyard. And we have a robust fishing industry, which dominates the local economy.

About an hour away from here in Bucksport, Maine, a giant paper mill used to employ hundreds of workers at good wages.  Now it’s closed, and a Canadian scrap metal firm is tearing it down.

So I painted it. And then I got into the exhibit. Here’s a description of the exhibit:

Now on display in the Atrium Art Gallery at USM’s Lewiston-Auburn campus is an exhibit of paintings, photographs, prints, and sculpture by 27 Maine artists called “Industrial Maine: Our Other Landscape.”

Guest curator Janice L. Moore paints  working factories and  abandoned work sites throughout the state.  She believes that, in Maine,

…we often reference our idealized natural state of forests, mountains, and coastline, but there is another overlooked landscape that tells an important truth about our culture, our history, and our potential.

Bucksport

Bucksport will survive. I hear a salmon fishery and a lobster processing company will move on to the property owned by the paper company.

But as for me, I’ve started to look at the landscape differently since painting the old paper mill. I’m now starting to see artistic possibilities in industrial Maine. And I’m thinking about painting ferry terminals, fuel storage tanks and abandoned sardine factories.

So stay tuned. And if you visit Lewiston, come see “Industrial Maine: Our Other Landscape.”

Deer Isle Artists Association Holiday Pop-Up Market

blue-christmas-leslie landrigan

I’ll have cards and small prints available for sale at the Deer Isle Artists Association Holiday Pop-Up Market on Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Winter Sunset

All cards will be 5″ by 7″ and prints will be in 8″ by 10″ mats. Cards are $5 each, while prints will be $18. Proceeds benefit the Deer Isle Artists Association.

blue-christmas-leslie landrigan
Blue Christmas

The blue Christmas tree above was actually right next to DIAA last year. Wonder if it will be back.

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Christmas Cat

This is Brownie, who was actually pondering an Angry Bird cat toy. I turned it into a Christmas ornament. And I turned Brownie from naughty into nice.

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Cynthia’s Barn

Cynthia’s Barn actually started out as an Instagram post last winter. I am not a plein air snob and often use photos for inspiration.

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On the Hard

I’ve actually painted this image several times. I could do a whole series on Deer Isle boats up on the hard.  But I should probably call this “On the Cold and White Stuff.”

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Skater

We sent this out as our Christmas card last year. It’s an image of a skater I made up from a bunch of photos I took on my lunch hour at the skating rink in front of the National Archives in Washington, D.C. a couple of years ago.  I was probably having a bad day at work. So many of them were.

Winter Sunset is an image of Stonington Harbor from Hagen Dock.  I can walk there from my house. I figure I’m pretty lucky to live here.

So come visit the DIAA gallery on Saturday.  There will also be work by Peter Beerits, Rory Beerits, Cynthia Bourque Simonds, Dorothy Doubleday, Mary Eaton, Judith Felch, Susan Finsen, Cathy Hart, Jill Kofton, Diane Maguire Horton, David McBeth, Kaitlyn Metcalf, Carolyn Raedle, Scott Thurston, Maura Tilloston, Francoise Gervais, Gertrude Tarr, Oscar Turner, Linda Wells and Pat White.

We’ll also have holiday treats available, and Candy Eaton is opening the Periwinkle that day right across the street.

The Floating World

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Memorial Day is the official start of summer in Downeast Maine, though that doesn’t mean it’s warm. It was so cold on Friday the Stonington Farmers Market opened with only seven shivering vendors, including me with a fresh batch of frozen seafood pies.

Kim Kral and Bob Gillmor pitch a tent at the Stonington Farmers Market on Saturday.

Wind is the real enemy of the farmers market. Richard Lymburner, who sells plants early and garlic late, lost his tent in a cold blast. Sunset Acres (meat, cheese and greens) didn’t bother to put up a tent, nor did I; I shared with Bob Gillmor, aka Spoon Bob for the wooden spoons he makes. Even with rocks weighting down his tent we had to hang on to it when the wind gusted.

Still, the summer people came and bought a few things. You can tell they’re here because some of them walk down the middle of the street, gazing rapturously at the beauty of coastal Maine. That ticks off the sternmen, who drive even more aggressively than usual on the roads.

Sternmen are young men who make a lot of money working on fishing boats. They’re paid with a portion of the haul. Stonington is the biggest lobster port in Maine; last year, $65.3 million worth of lobster was yanked out of the sea. That’s $343,000 per boat.

The sternmen drive their skiffs the way they drive on the roads. I love to watch them zip across the harbor, leaving a long white wake. One cloudless blue day I noticed one orange skiff breezing into Fish Pier. Since I’m a sucker for blue and orange, I took some pictures and then made a painting.

Driving Home

I called it Driving Home and posted it on Facebook. That prompted a response from my sister who lives in San Francisco:

I’m wanting more orange in the back. Love the reflection of the boat and the wake.

So I replied:

Thanks PK. You raise an interesting point about the orange. I was thinking of a burst of orange against the blue but I could have put some orange elsewhere, perhaps as dots or mixed with blue to make shadows. If I’d put orange in the back it would have brought the background forward and flattened the picture, though I’m not sure that’s a bad thing. The Japanese, you know.

That inspired another suggestion:

What if you put a bit more brown on the roof to ground the background a bit. I don’t know about art, so I’m not sure f it would flatten out the picture. But I do feel that the top left is floating away a bit. I like the pier too!!

So I went to the Deer Isle Artists Association, where the painting hangs next to one by my friend Carolyn Walton. I decided the roof was floating away. But I also decided it didn’t matter.

 

Eight of my paintings are now hanging at the DIAA gallery on Main Street in Deer Isle Village. They’ll be there until June 8 as part of the Make A Detour show. My notecards and postcards are there too. Stop by this Thursday morning (June 1) or Saturday afternoon (June 3) and say hi. I’ll be there peddling art.

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Inn on the Harbor, New Home for My Work

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There are at least two wonderful places to stay in Stonington: Inn on the Harbor and Boyce’s Motel.  Dan and I stayed at both while hunting for our dream home in Stonington, and we had nothing but good experiences.

Putting cards in racks at Inn on the Harbor.

Jay Brown and Dana Durst bought Inn on the Harbor a year ago and worked their tails off freshening it up. Over the winter they held community potlucks in their dining room, which is how I got to know them. (There is, by the way, a rich potluck culture on Deer Isle. You’d better have a couple of go-to hors d’oeuvres recipes if you want to survive the winter here.)

At their last potluck, I asked Jay and Dana if they’d be interested in selling notecards I’d made of Deer Isle scenes in winter

On the Hard, notecard, 5.5″ by 4″.

… spring

Oceanville Garden, notecard, 5.5″ by 4″

…summer

Deer Isle Bridge From Caterpillar Hill, notecard, 5.5″ by 4″

and fall.

Scott’s Landing in Autumn, notecard, 5.5″ by 4″.

They said sure, bring them on down.

But then the dilemma presented myself: How do I package them? So I ordered clear bags. Then I thought I need to explain what they are. So I ordered a postcard to go in the package with the cards.

While I was at it, I decided to order some more postcards.

Church of the Morning After, pastel
Blue Hill Overlook, watercolor
Clamming at Causeway Beach, watercolor
Moving Day. Watercolor
Boys o Summer, watercolor
Sand Beach, watercolor

The postcards arrived yesterday, so I spent this morning assembling what seemed like thousands of little doodads: notecards, envelopes, stickers, scotch tape, postcards. Fortunately the cats were not in terrorist mode and I got it all done without a mishap. (They find it comforting to chew on the cellophane bags.)

All the while I remembered two things people had told me: One, a salesman for R.R. Donnelley in Chicago. He said, “Anyone can write a book, not everyone can sell it.” The same applies to art, I thought. It’s one thing to sit in a studio and create images; quite another to schlep paintings around, reproduce them, frame them, price them, keep track of them (seriously) and convince people they don’t suck.

And I remembered what my friend Michael Daugherty said to me over the winter. He’s the former co-owner of the Isalos Gallery in Stonington with his wife Rebecca. Michael told me people have no idea the amount of work gallery owners put into selling a work of art. I take his point.

Anyhoo, my notecards and postcards are now on sale at the Inn on the Harbor in beautiful downtown Stonington, Maine. Stop in and see for yourself.

 

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Day Eighteen: Stonington Harbor

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I get a lesson in climate change at The Harbor Café, which overlooks Stonington Harbor.

Oscar and I decide to have lunch there on Day Eighteen. (Thursday, Jan. 27, if you’re keeping track of our artists-in-residency at the Deer Isle Artists Association gallery.)

The Harbor Café is a Stonington institution, open year round and, when nothing else is open, the restaurant of last resort. The food is what you’d expect in a Maine fishing village: hearty American fare.

Oscar and I sit in the window so we can watch the world go by, mostly in pickup trucks. Sandra brings me the haddock sandwich I ordered. The fish is the size of a pork roast. Oscar ordered the same. This is about as good as fried fish gets. We are happy.

Stonington Harbor. Hagen Dock is on the left.

“They’ve stopped working on Hagen Dock,” I say. “The barge is gone.”

A fisherman, an older gentleman at the next table, laughs. “They ran out of money,” he said. “They’re good at that.”

“They’ve done the hard part,” says Oscar.

“The hard part is finishing it,” says the fisherman.

“Maybe the hard part is paying for it,” I say.

Arrow points to the orange barrels on Hagen Dock. View from Harbor Cafe

The fisherman explains the dock has to be built up to the orange barrels. They’ve actually just paused because of the weather.

“There’s going to be a catwalk around it, so we can’t tie our skiffs up to the floating dock anymore,” says the fisherman. “Years ago I wanted them to fill in the harbor, build a wharf, shore up those buildings. When I first got here all those buildings were on dry land.”

Now they’re on pilings. “Wow,” I say.

“The tides are two feet higher than they were 20 years ago,” the fisherman says. “They used to be 10 feet. Now they’re 12. Those buildings are all gonna be gone. If they’d done like I suggested, we could put our boats right up to the wharf, there’d be parking.”

“People could walk along the waterfront,” I say. “Tourists love that.”

“And there’s plenty of grout,” he says. “Just barge it over from Crotch Island.” There is a quarry on Crotch Island. Some days when the wind is right you can hear the rumble and roar of the quarrying.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjiuCuuZQv8

Sandra brings the check. Oscar insists on paying. I always worry, because Oscar can’t do numbers. He pays with a credit card but he doesn’t leave a tip. I slip Sandra $5 bill. “Oscar can’t do numbers,” I say. She smiles.

I painted one of those buildings on the waterfront. Wonder how long it will last.

Lobster Traps on Stonington Harbor

 

 

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