Spring Sale! Cherry Blossom Watercolors

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It’s a little painful to read my friends’ Facebook posts about cherry blossom time in Washington, D.C., when I’m swathed in wool and hearing the wind howl outside. Mother Nature is not nice to Downeast Maine in the spring. We don’t even have crocuses yet. All we have is some buds and ducks exchanging amorous looks.

Since the rain and cold have kept me indoors, though, I’ve cleaned out my studio. And I found a lot of old watercolors. Way too many old watercolors.

cherry-blossom-time
Blue Cherries

This one, Blue Cherries, shows the cherry blossoms at Hains Point in Washington, D.C. Dan and I used to play golf there early on weekend mornings pretty much year round. During cherry blossom time we’d drive around the point for our own private cherry blossom viewing. It wasn’t at all crowded, which, if you know Washington, is saying a mouthful.

Cherry Blossom Time

cherry-blossom-time
Cherry Blossom Time

The Senate Garden also offered a few uncrowded moments on Capitol Hill , at least when the protesters were taking a break. (I shouldn’t make fun; I often joined the protests myself.) The Lower Garden is far enough from the Capitol that the paramilitary doesn’t patrol it much either. There’s nothing like the sight of a semi-automatic weapon to jolt one out of one’s cherry blossom reverie.

Anyway, I painted these two ladies blissfully contemplating cherry blossoms in the Senate Lower Garden. I like to think they had a nice trip to the nation’s capital.

 

 

 

cherry-blossom-time
Cherry Blossoms 

I probably stalked this poor woman because I liked the color of her coat and the way the light filtered through the cherry blossoms. When the right moment came I took some quick photos with my cell phone. I always carried a cell phone (had to), handy for snapping unsuspecting watercolor subjects on the streets of Washington, D.C. I took this somewhere near the House office buildings.

So … since they’re just a painful reminder that moving to Maine meant giving up spring, I decided to sell them for $100 apiece. I can’t even guarantee they’ll have a mat. But shoot me an email, [email protected], and let me know if you’re interested.

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Small Works Show at the Deer Isle Artists Association

small-works-bucks-market

The popular Small Works exhibit begins at the Deer Isle Artist Association on August 28 at 10 am and runs for two weeks.

I have seven small paintings in the show, including four oil paintings of Ames Pond, two watercolors of Brooksville, Maine, and one watercolor of Ossipee Mountain in New Hampshire.

Ames Pond, much loved in Stonington, proves you don’t need to go to Giverny to paint water lilies. Ames Pond used to be a meadow until it was dammed to make ice. For many years, people on Deer Isle cut ice from Ames Pond for their own use, and to ship to the West Indies for trade.

small-works-ames-pond
Ames Pond I. Oil on canvas.

Around 1932, a Deer Islander planted pink waterlilies in the pond, and they proliferated. The beavers love to eat their roots.

small-works-ames-pond-2
Ames Pond II. Oil on canvas.

Between 9 am and 2 pm in summer, the pink waterliles, as well as the wild white and yellow ones, open to the sun.

small-works-ames-pond-3
Ames Pond III. Oil on canvas.

I spent many hours as a young adult in front of Monet’s water lilies. I just loved them. Then after a while I got sick of them.  Perhaps I saw them on too many NPR tote bags, or at least thought I did.

small-works-ames-pond-4
Ames Pond IV. Oil on canvas.

But then, as a painter living in Maine, I found it  difficult NOT to paint Ames Pond. And I also found it nearly impossible NOT to take a page from Old Claude.

Other Small Works Paintings

Every Tuesday morning this summer you’ll find me selling prints, cards and paintings at the Brooksville Farmers Market.

I’ve wanted to paint Buck’s Market, a wonderful old general store near the market, since I first laid eyes on it. Many, many photographs later, I finally came up with images I could use for a watercolor:

small-works-bucks-market
Buck’s Market. Watercolor.

Brooksville people ask me if I have any paintings of Cape Rosier, a lovely wild peninsula in Brooksville. As a result, I do– at the Small Works show.

small-works-cape-rosier
Cape Rosier. Watercolor.

Finally, just to mix things up, I finished a long-unfinished watercolor of Ossipee Mountain for the Small Works show.  It was certainly a relief to paint snow after all that sunlight and greenery!

Ossipee Mountain. Watercolor.

 

Brooksville Farmers Market, Every Tuesday

Who knew that art lovers patronize the Brooksville Farmers Market?

Actually I did know. Paul Rickert, a wonderful watercolorist, used to sell his paintings at the lively little market in Brooksville, Maine.

The market is near Buck’s Harbor Marina and Buck’s Harbor Yacht  Club, so as you can imagine it attracts quite a few yachters and summer cottagers. Many of the cottagers go back generations to Brooksville. The Brooksville Farmers Market is also near a charming country store called (you guessed it) Buck’s Harbor Market and a fine restaurant called, yup, Buck’s.

Other vendors include Blue-Zee Farm, where Renata sells the best red peppers ever along with blueberries, lettuce and other produce, and Poland Farm, where Kevin sells farm-grown beef and pork. Sometimes he brings his guitar and sings King of the Road for me. (Along with other songs.)  I did a watercolor of Kevin a few years ago:

Brooksville Farmers Market. Watercolor on 140-lb. paper. 12″ by 12″.

I can’t leave out Courtney Haight, who, when he isn’t playing the steel drums, sells heirloom tomatoes, vinegars and barnboard tables.

Vendors also sell jewelry, coffee, lime fizz, jam, granola, books, photographs, eggs, lard, ceramics, textile art and lunch.

Brooksville Farmers Market

This spring I thought I’d try selling prints and cards at the Brooksville Farmers Market. I asked my mom to come up with a display (she’s much better at it than I am) and borrowed a tent from my friend Spoon Bob.

Part of my display t the Brooksville Farmers Market. Dad painted the “Artwork by Leslie Landrigan” sign.

As an afterthought, I included a few original watercolors in mats.

And I brought along four birdhouses that my dad painted over the winter.

brooksville-farmers'market-birdhouse
Birdhouse by Luke Miller.

The birdhouses, a steal at $39 each, have all gone home with a happy owner. So have a surprising number (to me) of original watercolors, along with quite a few prints.

These two guys are easily my best sellers.

brooksville-farmers-market-mack
Window Kitty. Print.

 

brooksville-farmres-market-sand-beach-2-mb
Sand Beach. Print.

So every Tuesday I schlep the tent, the tables, the tablecloths, the fake calla lilies, the box of cards, the box of prints, the easel, the framed painting, the cash box and the print rack, I drive them to Brooksville and I set them up. From 9:30 a.m. to noon I’m there, meeting new people and swapping market gossip with the other vendors.

So please come on down and say Hi!

Brooksville Farmers Market, Every Tuesday

brooksville-farmers-market-me
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Who knew that art lovers patronize the Brooksville Farmers Market?

Actually I did know. Paul Rickert, a wonderful watercolorist, used to sell his paintings at the lively little market in Brooksville, Maine.

The market is near Buck’s Harbor Marina and Buck’s Harbor Yacht  Club, so as you can imagine it attracts quite a few yachters and summer cottagers. Many of the cottagers go back generations to Brooksville. The Brooksville Farmers Market is also near a charming country store called (you guessed it) Buck’s Harbor Market and a fine restaurant called, yup, Buck’s.

Other vendors include Blue-Zee Farm, where Renata sells the best red peppers ever along with blueberries, lettuce and other produce, and Poland Farm, where Kevin sells farm-grown beef and pork. Sometimes he brings his guitar and sings King of the Road for me. (Along with other songs.)  I did a watercolor of Kevin a few years ago:

Brooksville Farmers Market. Watercolor on 140-lb. paper. 12″ by 12″.

I can’t leave out Courtney Haight, who, when he isn’t playing the steel drums, sells heirloom tomatoes, vinegars and barnboard tables.

Vendors also sell jewelry, coffee, lime fizz, jam, granola, books, photographs, eggs, lard, ceramics, textile art and lunch.

Brooksville Farmers Market

This spring I thought I’d try selling prints and cards at the Brooksville Farmers Market. I asked my mom to come up with a display (she’s much better at it than I am) and borrowed a tent from my friend Spoon Bob.

Part of my display t the Brooksville Farmers Market. Dad painted the “Artwork by Leslie Landrigan” sign.

As an afterthought, I included a few original watercolors in mats.

And I brought along four birdhouses that my dad painted over the winter.

brooksville-farmers'market-birdhouse
Birdhouse by Luke Miller.

The birdhouses, a steal at $39 each, have all gone home with a happy owner. So have a surprising number (to me) of original watercolors, along with quite a few prints.

These two guys are easily my best sellers.

brooksville-farmers-market-mack
Window Kitty. Print.

 

brooksville-farmres-market-sand-beach-2-mb
Sand Beach. Print.

So every Tuesday I schlep the tent, the tables, the tablecloths, the fake calla lilies, the box of cards, the box of prints, the easel, the framed painting, the cash box and the print rack, I drive them to Brooksville and I set them up. From 9:30 a.m. to noon I’m there, meeting new people and swapping market gossip with the other vendors.

So please come on down and say Hi!

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Engagement of Poetry at DIAA

engagement-of-poetry-dories
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I didn’t expect to be in the Deer Isle Artists Association  latest exhibit, Engagement of Poetry, but someone dropped out. So when asked if I’d participate, of course I said yes.

Since I’ve had such a busy summer, I only had time to submit three watercolors. I ended up with three very different ones.

Engagement of Poetry

The first, Brooksville Morning, came about because I go to the Brooksville Farmers Market every Tuesday to sell prints, cards and original artwork. I drive past this farm to get there, and I love how it looks in the fog. (There’s been a lot of fog this summer.)

We had to come up with statements about what inspired our work for the Exhibit of Poetry show. Here’s what I wrote for Brooksville Morning:

Fog reveals the loveliness of the earth on a summer morning.

engagement-of-poetry-brooksville-morning
Brooksville Morning, watercolor. Shown at ‘Engagement of Poetry’ exhibit.

The second painting, Dories, came about because I love these old boats. They’re tied up on a rocky little beach in Stonington.

Back in the day, farmers built dories like this in summer and used them to fish for lobster in the summer. Today, their owner uses them to seine for bait.

engagement-of-poetry-dories
Dories, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry at DIAA.

Here’s what I wrote for Engagement of Poetry:

The wisdom of old boats, the enchantment of the sea.

That ‘enchantment’ business may sound sappy, but it’s true. Stonington has for a long time had some of the best sailors and fishermen in the world, and it isn’t because they hate the sea.

Finally, here’s an image that started out as a sketch for another painting.  I made it up; it has part Stonington, part Cape Rosier in Brooksville and part Eggemoggin Reach in Deer Isle.

engagement-of-poetry-clouds
Clouds, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry.

Above the limpid sea, clouds are never still.

So come on down to the DIAA at 15 Main St. in Deer Isle. The artists’ reception is Sunday, Aug. 19, from 3-5 pm. We’ll also be at DIS Friday on Friday, Aug. 17, with cookies, lemonade and used art books for sale (in addition to the art).

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Engagement of Poetry at DIAA

engagement-of-poetry-dories

I didn’t expect to be in the Deer Isle Artists Association  latest exhibit, Engagement of Poetry, but someone dropped out. So when asked if I’d participate, of course I said yes.

Since I’ve had such a busy summer, I only had time to submit three watercolors. I ended up with three very different ones.

Engagement of Poetry

The first, Brooksville Morning, came about because I go to the Brooksville Farmers Market every Tuesday to sell prints, cards and original artwork. I drive past this farm to get there, and I love how it looks in the fog. (There’s been a lot of fog this summer.)

We had to come up with statements about what inspired our work for the Exhibit of Poetry show. Here’s what I wrote for Brooksville Morning:

Fog reveals the loveliness of the earth on a summer morning.

engagement-of-poetry-brooksville-morning
Brooksville Morning, watercolor. Shown at ‘Engagement of Poetry’ exhibit. 

The second painting, Dories, came about because I love these old boats. They’re tied up on a rocky little beach in Stonington.

Back in the day, farmers built dories like this in summer and used them to fish for lobster in the summer. Today, their owner uses them to seine for bait.

engagement-of-poetry-dories
Dories, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry at DIAA.

Here’s what I wrote for Engagement of Poetry:

The wisdom of old boats, the enchantment of the sea.

That ‘enchantment’ business may sound sappy, but it’s true. Stonington has for a long time had some of the best sailors and fishermen in the world, and it isn’t because they hate the sea.

Finally, here’s an image that started out as a sketch for another painting.  I made it up; it has part Stonington, part Cape Rosier in Brooksville and part Eggemoggin Reach in Deer Isle.

engagement-of-poetry-clouds
Clouds, watercolor. Shown in Engagement of Poetry.

Above the limpid sea, clouds are never still.

 

 

 

The 12 by 12 (By 12) Is Here!

12-by-12-Farmers-Market
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The Deer Isle Artists Association’s popular 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibit is scheduled to start Tuesday, July 31, at 10 am sharp.

Be there at the starting gate if you have your eye on a particular work of art.

The 12 by 12 (By 12) features paintings, prints and collages (also known as wall art) no bigger than 12″ by 12.” It also includes 3-dimensional art, such as ceramics, baskets, fiber art and sculpture, also no bigger than — you guessed it — 12″ by 12″ by 12″.

Every work of art sells at an extremely reasonable price of $144 ($12 X $12). The gallery hangs new work as pieces sell. The show lasts two weeks, as all DIAA summer exhibits do, until August 12.

The exhibit is important to the DIAA because it raises money for operating costs.

If you’d like to meet the artists, the reception will be held on Sunday, Aug. 5, from 3 pm to 5 pm. Wine and lemonade will be served, and there will be plenty of food as well.

I’ve shown my work in the past two 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibits. This year I’m donating three watercolors to the show.

They are: Farmers Market,12-by-12-Farmers-Market

Farmers Market, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″Caterpillar Hill and

12-by-12-Caterpillar-Hill
Caterpillar Hill, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

and, finally, Cape Rosier.

12-by-12-Cape-Rosier
Cape Rosier, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

These are all Maine scenes. Farmers Market, as its name implies, pictures a scene from the Stonington Farmers Market,

Caterpillar Hill is the view from a stunning lookout on Route 15 on the way to Deer Isle (or the way back). It overlooks Penobscot Bay, the island and the Penobscot River. If you happen to drive by, check out the informational markers. I believe they explain the disastrous Penobscot Expedition during the American Revolution. It didn’t go well for Paul Revere.

Cape Rosier is a part of Brooksville, also part of the Blue Hill peninsula. I’ve just recently discovered this beautiful part of the world and plan to paint much more of it!

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DIAA’s 12 by 12 (By 12) Show Starts

12-by-12-Farmers-Market

The Deer Isle Artists Association’s popular 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibit is scheduled to start Tuesday, July 31, at 10 am sharp.

Be there at the starting gate if you have your eye on a particular work of art.

The 12 by 12 (By 12) features paintings, prints and collages (also known as wall art) no bigger than 12″ by 12.” It also includes 3-dimensional art, such as ceramics, baskets, fiber art and sculpture, also no bigger than — you guessed it — 12″ by 12″ by 12″.

Every work of art sells at an extremely reasonable price of $144 ($12 X $12). The gallery hangs new work as pieces sell. The show lasts two weeks, as all DIAA summer exhibits do, until August 12.

The exhibit is important to the DIAA because it raises money for operating costs.

If you’d like to meet the artists, the reception will be held on Sunday, Aug. 5, from 3 pm to 5 pm. Wine and lemonade will be served, and there will be plenty of food as well.

I’ve shown my work in the past two 12 by 12 (By 12) exhibits. This year I’m donating three watercolors to the show.

They are: Farmers Market,12-by-12-Farmers-Market

Farmers Market, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

Caterpillar Hill and

12-by-12-Caterpillar-Hill
Caterpillar Hill, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

and, finally, Cape Rosier.

12-by-12-Cape-Rosier
Cape Rosier, Watercolor, 12″ by 12″

These are all Maine scenes. Farmers Market, as its name implies, pictures a scene from the Stonington Farmers Market,

Caterpillar Hill is the view from a stunning lookout on Route 15 on the way to Deer Isle (or the way back). It overlooks Penobscot Bay, the island and the Penobscot River. If you happen to drive by, check out the informational markers. I believe they explain the disastrous Penobscot Expedition during the American Revolution. It didn’t go well for Paul Revere.

Cape Rosier is a part of Brooksville, also part of the Blue Hill peninsula. I’ve just recently discovered this beautiful part of the world and plan to paint much more of it!

Shape of Waters at the Deer Isle Artists Association

shape-of-waters-44-north
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The Shape of Waters exhibit has already started at the Deer Isle Artists Association  in Deer Isle Village. I have five paintings in the show, all of which depict some kind of work.

Why Work?

When I left journalism to work for a labor union, I thought I should decorate my office with an image of an American worker. So I went to the National Gallery of Art, thinking the gift shop would have a poster, print or even a notecard  depicting someone at work.

I was hoping for a nice big WPA poster,

shape-of-waters-forging

but I would have settled for a print of an Ashcan School painting — McSorley’s Bar, for example.

shape-of-waters-mcsorleys-bar
McSorley’s Bar by John Sloan.

By the time I’d spent an hour looking through the merchandise, I would have been happy to find a notecard with Millet’s The Gleaners on it.

shape-of-waters-gleaner
Jean-Francois Millet, The Gleaners

I couldn’t find one single reproduction of a painting, print or sculpture that showed an American working. I’d soon learn how invisible the working class is in the United States, but that’s a whole other story.

Since moving to Deer Isle I’ve started to paint people at work. Usually I’ll spot them in a certain light or against a certain backdrop and I’ll ask them if I can take their picture. I take a bunch, then sometimes I go back and study the setting a little more. That’s what I did when I spotted Danielle washing windows at Inn on the Harbor.

shape-of-waters-danielle
Danielle

The painting now hangs against the yellow wall in the Inn on the Harbor lobby.

Since then I’ve done more, including Kim at 44 North. That painting — 44 North — is now in the Shape of Waters show.

shape-of-waters-44-north
44 North

I also have a painting of Dan collecting beach glass at Scott’s Landing, which is work to him, in the Shape of Waters show. Others show a painter caulking a windowsill, a shipyard worker scraping a boat, and the Stonington town cat — yes, that would be Dundee) supervising the town.

So come by and see the Shape of Waters show. There’s a reception from 3-5 pm on Sunday, July 8, at the gallery, where you can meet all the artists.

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DIS Friday in Stonington at the Island Agency

window-kitty
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I’ll be selling new watercolor paintings, some oldies but goodies, prints, notecards and postcards at the Island Agency in Stonington on Friday, July 6. It’s DIS Friday (Deer Isle-Stonington for the uninitiated), which goes from 5-7 pm in downtown Stonington.

Wine and hors d’oeuvres are inseparable from art, so I’ll have those on hand, too!

Here’s one of my favorite new paintings I’ll bring along:

deer-isle-morning-island-agency
Deer Isle Morning, watercolor, 12″ by 16″

It’s a scene from just past the causeway across from Scott’s Landing.

I’ll also bring along a couple of watercolors with more somber palettes. This one, for example, also shows a scene from the causeway, but in November.

november-sunset
November Sunset, watercolor, 12″ by 16″.

It reflected my mood at the time. I believe our furnace had just gone on the fritz.

Changing Seasons, Changing Palette

I’ve noticed, though, that my paintings get darker and more muted in the winter, and brighter and sunnier in the summer.

For example, here’s a watercolor I did of the forest floor at the Island Heritage Trust’s Tennis Reservation.

tennis-reservation
Tennis, watercolor, 12″ by 16″

I painted Tennis in April, when it’s cold and raw and overcast every single day. Or at least it seems like that.

But then comes summer and my palette gets a lot brighter — especially when the lupines come out.

lupine-madness-smaller
Lupine Madness, watercolor, 11.5 by 11.5.

Tomorrow at the Island Agency I’ll be selling matted prints of Lupine Madness, Deer Isle Morning and other paintings of Deer Isle for $20. I’ll also have prints of some paintings of interiors — which usually means cats.

window-kitty
Window Kitty, matted 4.5″ by 6.5″ print

Inventory isn’t my strong suit (I’m an artist, after all), but I will have some notecards and postcards for sale as well.

So please stop by the Island Agency tomorrow and check out my artwork.

 

 

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